Babe and Shug were 6 and 16 when we got them, 10 years between them.  They are two very broke, very nice horses.  Any sane individual would settle in with that pair and live out their horsey years as happy as a lark. 


For who knows what reason, a horse of a different color crossed my path.  Follow the link above titled HOW IT ALL BEGAN to see how we changed horses in midstream.

The Story of Life with Spanish Mustangs


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During high school, I was around stock as my siblings showed hogs and steers in the county shows and on occasion went to the big events in Houston or San Antonio.  Being the oldest, I was generally the chauffeur and fill-in for whichever sibling couldn't tend for their own animal that day.  After leaving home I went many years with no exposure to horses or cattle.


A few years back, around 2005 or so, a friend of mine purchased mules and we began using mules for hunting here in Texas and on Elk hunting ventures to Colorado.  I literally found myself in a new world astride the saddle of a mule as we moved quickly and quietly through country I had only seen from afar.  I didn't realize it, but I was growing strongly attached to the idea of an animal of their size willingly serving our needs and working together with us as a partner.


While still riding mules and unknowingly advancing towards the life I live today, I came in possession of a very nicely bred Palomino Quarter Horse.  My wife and I have always done everything together, so it only made sense that we obtain a matching pair as I soon purchased yet another nicely bred Palomino Quarter Horse.  Two excellent horses for the beginning horse owners.

Our lives have not always been about the passion for Spanish Mustangs.  In fact, we never owned livestock in prior years.  I had been exposed to horses as a youngster on my great grandparents farm in Kansas.  I had ridden a couple of horses that we were turned lose with for hours on end.  Looking back and knowing what I know today, those were some real bomb proof kid horses that were capable of tolerating the impossible.